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Barnes, Richardson & Colburn LLP

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Managing Partners: Rick Van Arnam (NY), Brian F. Walsh (Chicago), Matthew T. McGrath (DC)
Number of partners: 7 Number of lawyers: 11
Languages: Chinese, English, French, German, Turkish

Firm Overview:
Barnes, Richardson & Colburn has focused its practice exclusively on serving the regulatory and compliance needs of companies engaged in international trade for over 100 years. The firm practices before US agencies including Customs & Border Protection, the Department of Commerce, the Department of State (Directorate of Defense Trade Controls), Department of Treasury (Office of Foreign Assets Control), the International Trade Commission, and the Office of the United States Trade Representative. Barnes/Richardson represents large and medium-sized companies in diverse industries including automotive, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, farm equipment, agricultural products, and durable goods. When necessary, Barnes/Richardson lawyers litigate trade-related disputes in the U.S. Court of International Trade and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Main Areas of Practice:
Tariff Classification
Customs Valuation
Customs Audits
Free Trade Agreements
Internal Compliance Reviews
Admissibility
Customs Penalties, Seizures & Forfeitures
Border Enforcement of Intellectual Property
Origin, Labeling & Marking
Trade in Art, Antiquities & Cultural Property
Trade Remedies
Antidumping Investigations & Reviews
Countervailing Duty Investigations & Reviews
Sunset Reviews
Scope Rulings
Circumvention Reviews
Enforce & Protect Act Claims
Export Controls (Commerce Department)
ITAR (State Department)
Sanctions Compliance (OFAC)
Antiboycott Compliance
Trade Legislation

Customs:

7 partners, 11 lawyers
■ Import compliance including internal reviews, process design, training and advice concerning tariff classification, customs valuation, rate of duty (including free trade agreement and duty avoidance), country of origin, labeling, admissibility, and duty drawback
■ Defense and representation in Customs audits and investigations, penalty actions (including seizures and forfeitures), prior disclosures, and liquidated damages claims
■ Trade-related compliance for US federal agencies including Environmental Protection Agency, Food & Drug Administration, Fish & Wildlife Service, and others ■ Trade in art, antiquities, and cultural property
■ Litigation before the U.S. Court of International Trade and U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

Trade:
7 partners, 11 lawyers
■ Representing non-US producers and exporters responding to US government antidumping and countervailing duty investigations, reviews, verifications, separate rate applications and sunset reviews
■ Appearing before the Department of Commerce and the International Trade Commission on behalf of non-US producers and exporters in antidumping and countervailing duty investigations and review
■ Advising US industries seeking to prepare and submit petitions for relief from unfair trade practices including dumping and countervailable subsidies
■ Representing US industries through antidumping and countervailing duty investigations, reviews, and sunset reviews
■ Advising US importers of products subject to additional duties relating to trade remedies including scope requests to the Department of Commerce and disputes with Customs & Border Protection over the collection of trade remedy duties
■ Litigation before the U.S. Court of International trade and U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

Export Controls:
7 partners, 11 lawyers
■ Review of product classifications in the Commerce Control List to assign Export Control Classification Numbers (‘ECCN’) and securing Commodity Classification Automated Tracking System (‘CCATS’) confirmations of classification
■ Securing Department of Commerce export licenses for dual-use products, technical data, encryption devices, and deemed exports
■ Requesting Commodity Jurisdiction (‘CJ’) clarifications from the Department of State for products potentially subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (‘ITAR’)
■ Securing State Department licenses for the export of articles and defense services
■ Registration under the Arms Export Control Act
■ Advising on Office of Foreign Assets Control (‘OFAC’) sanctions compliance including denied party screening
■ Voluntary self-disclosures of potential violations to the Department of Commerce, Department of State and Department of Treasury
■ Defending enforcement actions brought by the government for apparent violations of the export control laws and regulations